Eatymology Meat Beat: Short Loin

Welcome to Eatymology’s Meat Beat where I help myself (and like-minded dummies) build our meat vocabulary,  beginning with the 8 (or 9, depending on who’s asking) basic US primal cutsfor beef. That’s butcher parlance for the slabs of bloody, lard-marbled, pre-delicious protein stripped from a cowrcas. Note that UK primal cuts and pork primal cuts are different.

Today’s edition: short loin.

Who knows what's good? The King knows what's good.

I’ve been remiss – and at a particularly salivating juncture – the one sandwiched between the fat-rich rib and the lusty love handle region (more on that in time): the short loin.    This cut picks up at the thirteenth rib, and extends through the spinal region. The backbone’s intrusion into this succulent protein quarry bequeaths identity unto two popular and beloved steak-shaped steaks: the Portherhouse, and the T-bone.

'T' stands for Tasty, Tasty proTein.

It’s worth noting here that cuts of steak are fairly loosely defined. The only delineation between the Porterhouse and the T-bone, for instance, is that the former contains “more” tenderloin. Stripped of bone, these cuts become the thus-named “strip” steak.

I’ll conclude with an exert on Eatmedaily.com, on the etymological origins of the Porterhouse:

The Porterhouse’s name came a New York tradition from the 1840’s. Restaurants would advertise specials on a beef steak served with a flagon of porter, which sounds like my kind of party. The cut houses an excellent amount of top sirloin, and a bigger amount of the aforementioned tenderloin.

Eatymology Meat Beat: Brisket

Welcome to Eatymology’s Meat Beat where I help myself (and like-minded dummies) build our meat vocabulary,  beginning with the 8 (or 9, depending on who’s asking) basic US primal cutsfor beef. That’s butcher parlance for the slabs of bloody, lard-marbled, pre-delicious protein stripped from a cowrcas. Note that UK primal cuts and pork primal cuts are different.

Thus far, we’ve covered cuts in the upper-front (chuck; rib) and upper-back quadrants (round). The cut of the day is brisket. Brisket lies just below the chuck, in the cow’s pectoral region (there’s speculation that ‘brisket’ is a variation of ‘breast’), and between two slices of rye bread, in its sammich carnation, corned beef.

Corned-Beef Sammich

Continue reading

Eatymology: Enter The Florentine

Welcome to Eatymology, where I help myself (and like-minded dummies) build our menu and grocery store vocabulary.

I came across an interesting (though likely apocryphal) piece of trivia whilst planning out my weekend brunch (yes; I know it’s Tuesday), concerning Eggs Florentine, Eggs Benedicts’ vegetarian compadre.

Florentine Lady

Continue reading

Eatymology Meat Beat: Rib

Welcome to Eatymology’s Meat Beat where I help myself (and like-minded dummies) build our meat vocabulary,  beginning with the 8 (or 9, depending on who’s asking) basic US primal cuts for beef. That’s butcher parlance for the slabs of bloody, lard-marbled, pre-delicious protein stripped from a cowrcas. Note that UK primal cuts and pork primal cuts are different.

Now that we’ve gotten the gamier discount chops out of the way, we’re left with the juicy, tender middle bits. We’ll start with the eater-friendly rib.

Rib: getting to the good stuff.

Continue reading

Eatymology: Vandaag Edition

Welcome to Eatymology, where I help myself (and like-minded dummies) build our menu and grocery store vocabulary.

“Our cultural contribution to the world isn’t culinary,” cautioned my Dutch companion. We were sitting at the aesthetically sharp and recently Siftonified Vandaag (www.vandaagnyc.com), where I was about to try Frisian food for the first time, and, in the process, learn a little Dutch.

The cumulative intrigue factor of foods like mustardy bitterballen and sea urchin bisque, potables like steamy apple grog, and avant-garde environs are enough to make Vandaag a ‘must-do-date-spot’ for lovers concerned with appearing cool. Vandaag’s menu was suitably seasonal, and we opted to share selections from its hearty, hardy appetizer menu while watching ferocious precipitate fall outside. The eatymological highlights, after the jump -

The Two-Star Shuffle.

Continue reading

Eatymology: Meat Beat – Round

Welcome to Eatymology’s Meat Beat where I help myself (and like-minded dummies) build our meat vocabulary,  beginning with the 8 (or 9, depending on who’s asking) basic US primal cuts for beef. That’s butcher parlance for the slabs of bloody, lard-marbled, pre-delicious protein stripped from a cowrcas. Note that UK primal cuts and pork primal cuts are different.

Today’s edition: Round.

Round: thick and juicy.

Continue reading

Deal Alert: $1 off Starbucks Coffee for NY / SF

From ChowHour.com:

http://chowhour.com/chowhour/

Get $1 rebate on your Starbucks coffee today! Offer good Feb 4, 2011 ONLY, – just send us a photo of the receipt! (Quantities limited to first 100 submissions – one submission per human!)

1. Buy a Starbucks coffee in New York City or San Francisco Bay Area only.

2. Snap a photo of the receipt – make sure the date (Feb 4, 2011) and address of merchant is visible – and upload it to us.

3. Fill out your name, zip, and email address.

4. We will process rebates within 48 hours and refund to PayPal accounts.


Eatymology: Meat Beat – Chuck

Welcome to Eatymology, where I help myself (and like-minded dummies) build our menu and grocery store vocabulary.

A recurring resolution -one at perennial odds with the accompanying ‘lose 8 pounds’- is to learn my meat, and you better believe I’m taking you along for the ride – beginning with the 8 (or 9, depending on who’s asking) basic US primal cuts for beef. That’s butcher parlance for the slabs of bloody, lard-marbled, pre-delicious protein stripped from a cowrcas. Note that UK primal cuts and pork primal cuts are different, and may or may not be addressed after the fifth pound.

Today’s edition: Chuck.

Chuck: tough, but tasty.

Continue reading

Eatymology: Gianduja

Welcome to Eatymology, where I help myself (and like-minded dummies) build our menu and grocery store vocabulary.

I have a tree-nut allergy. It’s tragic – I’ll never be a real food critique; I’ll never know the joy of pesto, and upwards of 50% of commercial Halloween candy. As such, I’ve always fumbled futilely for a word to describe Non-Swiss European Chocolate – you know, the kind that’s inevitably laced with hazelnut, and hence, off-limits for me. Continue reading

Edibill.com: Brand our start-up. Win stuff. Get famous. Live happily ever after.

From edibill.com:

A new dining discount site is looking for a zesty, zingy web theme – designed by YOU!

Create a web portal theme that includes a logo, a banner, a layout, and, hell – a NAME*!

All entries must be received by Friday, February 25. Once we pick our favorites, we’ll open the polls up to everyone in reach of a computer, smart phone or telephone and let YOU DECIDE by popular vote which name, logo and theme will be the face of our new company, set to launch in March, 2011.

The winner will receive, in addition to eternal glory, a TBD food prize. Trust us, you’ll love it.

*name.com must be an available domain! If you’re only interested in submitting a design, please use EDIBILL as the placeholder.

Continue reading

Eatymology: Casa Mono Edition

Welcome to Eatymology, where I help myself (and like-minded dummies) build our menu and grocery store vocabulary.

Today’s edition draws inspiration from top tapas spot Casa Mono, where you might just be able to maneuver the menu with your high school Spanish and a little imaginative cognate word association. I’ll leave the heavy lifting in this vein to Dana, and give you the benefit of a doubt by withholding a full-on review (you want to eat here; you’ve been meaning to eat here forever). A Casa Mono word-cloud glossary (and what I ate) after the jump -

Continue reading

Eatymology: Financier

Welcome to Eatymology, where I help myself (and like-minded dummies) build our menu and grocery store vocabulary.

Financier Patisserie, the Manhattan cake franchise, has a bad rap, and today’s edition is fiercely dedicated to clearing its name – literally! Its Wall Street and Midtown locations may provide easy-access for stress-eating investment bankers, but if you’re like me, you were surprised to learn (from Top Chef: Just Desserts, obv) that the financier (‘finan-see-ay’) is actually an almond tea cake with an interesting little history.

Continue reading

Eatymology: Confit

Welcome to Eatymology, where I help myself (and like-minded dummies) build our menu and grocery store vocabulary.

For some diners, ignorance is bliss. For others, reading their veal’s dream diary and knowing the lineage of their goose gavager makes the consumption of foie gras escalopes that much more real. If you’re the type that would rather not know what’s in your sausage, read no further; for today’s Eatymology dares you to internalize the gross and awesome power of a confit (‘con-fee’).

‘Confit’ originated as a blanket term for food preparation. It evolved to refer specifically to preserved foods. In restaurants today, you’ll see it applied almost exclusively to fruits and candies (occasionally called ‘comfit’), and, because the French successfully dictate all arbitrary dining dogma, as duck (or goose) confit.


Continue reading

Eatymology: Mirepoix

Welcome to Eatymology, where I help myself (and like-minded dummies) build our menu and grocery store vocabulary.

I first came across today’s term (pronounced ‘meer-pwa’) during a game of high-brow pictionary (my friends are awesome). You’ll remember it because it sounds more like a species of exotic hummingbird than it does a blend (any blend) of onions, carrots and celery.

Mirepoix: Stock(ing) Stuff(er)

Continue reading